1119 8th Ave, Seattle, WA, 98101, United States

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Future Events

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Past Events

Friday
Sep
25
2015
Friday, September 25, 2015 at 8pm
8pm
One of Mali’s most well-respected vocalists, Kasse Mady Diabate is descended from a long line of griots (of the Manding musical class) and considered “musical royalty” in West Africa. He’ll celebrate his country’s rich diversity in a melodic–and very listenable–evening celebrating the traditional tunes he’s been perfecting for five decades. From international collaborations to solo works, Diabate’s projects have earned him critical acclaim worldwide. His performances are so compelling that, according to The Arts Desk, listening to Diabate “is like sitting in a Bamako compound, late at night, under the stars, and being sung to, person to person.”
Thursday
Sep
17
2015
Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 7:30pm
7:30pm
With this summer’s shooting and burnings in African American churches, it’s easy to see that racial tensions are still predominant in today’s America. The prejudice runs deep–and can be traced to the nation’s historic slave-owning roots. According to University of Washington professor Carver Clark Gayton, no other story more exemplifies the history of slavery’s effect on today’s world than his ancestor Lewis G. Clarke–whose personal life was the basis of a character in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Gayton’s book When Owing a Shilling Costs a Dollar, is an account of Clarke (who, while only ⅛ black, was still considered property of white men). Clark Gayton will share this story, explaining that “the wounds from whippings and floggings would heal, but the psychological scars were passed on to future generations”–both black and white–and offer his hopeful outlook for the future.
Wednesday
Sep
16
2015
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 at 7pm
7pm
Sustainable Path Foundation presents Renee Lertman: The Myth of Climate Change Apathy 9/16, Wednesday - 7pm door, 7:30pm start - Tickets $5 Do personal anxieties and emotional responses to ecological problems hinder our ability to act effectively? According to Royal Roads University’s Renee Lertzman, tackling climate change takes more than behavioral changes–it also requires an underlying shift in human emotions. She argues that rather than being apathetic to global environmental issues, people care deeply–they just don’t know how to reframe their thinking. She’ll discuss the psychology of climate change, outline strategies for fixing our so-called apathy, and explain why it’s important to mobilize for change now, before it’s too late. Renee Lertzman, PhD, has been teaching and consulting in the environmental and climate sectors for two decades. Her research focuses on addressing public apathy and applying insights from psychological practice to support, unleash, and unlock our capacities. She teaches in the MA Environmental Education and Communications program at Royal Roads University, is a Fellow with the Global Sustainability Institute at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, UK, and works with organizations internationally. She is the author of Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic Dimensions of Engagement, a textbook featuring her research on apathy and environmental action, and is working on the follow-up, The Myth of Apathy.
Tuesday
Sep
15
2015
Tuesday, September 15, 2015 at 7:15pm
7:15pm
Legendary Mexican chamber group Tembembe Ensamble Continuo returns to Seattle for an exploration of Spanish and Mexican Baroque guitar–with a modern twist. They’ll demonstrate why, far from being a thing of the past, Baroque music continues to influence traditional Mexican sones. Named after the river Tembembe that runs through Cuernavaca and past their rehearsal venue, group’s name is an ever-present reminder of their heritage–“thus flows our culture, thus flows our work.” This concert will begin with a short ceremony marking Mexican Independence.
Thursday
Sep
10
2015
Thursday, September 10, 2015 at 7:30pm
7:30pm
Earthquakes occur in the Pacific Northwest, and in the Puget Sound we’re particularly at risk for “The Big One.” Between 2004-14, there were 18 earthquakes around the world (with seismic magnitudes greater than 8.0), which occurred at an annual rate of 2.5 times greater than the previous century. The University of California Santa Cruz’s Thorne Lay will explain how geophysicists analyzed the ground motions recorded by global networks of high-quality seismic, geodetic, and tsunami systems, advancing our understanding of these dangerous events. Lay will also provide concrete examples of how these earthquakes are revising scientific ideas about the behavior of huge fault ruptures and indicating the need for improved mitigation efforts.