1119 Eighth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101 Downstairs at Town Hall; enter on Seneca Street. $5. Double Feature!

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Past Events

Tuesday
Sep
9
2014
Tuesday, September 9, 2014 from 7:30-8:45pm
7:30-8:45pm
Sales for this event have been capped at 500 tickets to preserve a more intimate speaking environment. Advance tickets for this event are sold out. A limited number of standby tickets may be available beginning at 7:15 pm. For more info on standby tickets check out our Box Office FAQs! What if all of the water in the world disappeared? Are plastic dinosaurs actually real dinosaurs? Could raindrops shatter a windshield? Part webcomic, part scientific study, Randall Munroe's popular What If? column answers these and other hypothetical questions by crunching numbers, analyzing scientific theories, and drawing mini comics. In his new book What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions, he revisits his favorite questions -- with expanded answers, diagrams, and never-before-seen comics -- and includes a list of the "weirdest questions" people have submitted over the years. A former NASA employee, Munroe is now a full-time expert, cartoonist, and blogger at his "amazing" xkcd blog. Presented by: Town Hall and University Book Store, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures, sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Town Hall member benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to Nick Bostrom: The Future of Artificial Intelligence at 6:00 p.m. Doors open: 7:00 p.m. Learn more: Read the What If column. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/randall-munroe-answering-what-if/
Tuesday, September 9, 2014 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Advance tickets for this event are sold out. A limited number of standby tickets may be available beginning at 5:45 pm. Standby tickets do not grant admission to the 7:30 pm double feature. Within three decades, artificial intelligence might be the dominant species on Earth. According to Oxford's Nick Bostrom, this will be the future -- unless humans do something to stop it. Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, and Strategies analyzes the fundamental question of whether or not AI is a friend or foe to human intelligence. With increased advances in science and technology, Bostrom says it's possible humans will become dependent on this superintelligence down the road. He'll offer concrete strategies -- such as creating a "seed artificial intelligence" -- for containing and combating the precarious waters of humanity's future. A professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford, Bostrom is also Director of the Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology. Presented by: Town Hall and University Book Store, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures, sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Town Hall member benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to Randall Munroe: Answering 'What If?' at 7:30 p.m. Doors open: 5:30 p.m. Learn more: About the author. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/nick-bostrom-the-future-of-artificial-intelligence/
Wednesday
May
21
2014
Wednesday, May 21, 2014 from 7:30-8:45pm
7:30-8:45pm
"Microbes almost killed all life on Earth" -- 252 million years ago. These miniscule particles are everywhere and as the Permian Mass Extinction shows, they can also have a devastating effect on other life forms. The Amoeba in the Room: Lives of the Microbes takes an in-depth look at these tiny organisms, from the standing water of ponds to the viruses lining our stomach walls. Nicholas P. Money argues that the long-overlooked, understudied microbial world is the most important facet of all life on earth. In an attempt to share the magnificence of the "invisible rulers of our planet," Money advocates restructuring biology education and changing the way scientists think about the "unseen microscopic majority." Money is Professor of Botany at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and the author of four books, including The Mysterious World of Mushrooms, Molds, and Mycologists. Presented by: Town Hall in partnership with University Book Store, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to UW Science Now: Sharon Greenblum: Stories From Your Stomach and Jacquelyn Braggin: Viruses Sneak to Survive at 6:00 p.m. Town Hall Member Benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales. Doors open: 7:00 p.m. Learn more: Watch the book trailer. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/nicholas-p-money-the-microbes-around-us/
Wednesday, May 21, 2014 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Trillions of microscopic bugs crawl around in our bodies every day. Sharon Greenblum, a graduate student in the Genome Sciences Department, says these bugs -- which line skin, noses, and stomach walls -- collectively weigh 3-4 pounds in each person. She's studying the bugs in the stomachs of healthy and diseased individuals, to find out which ones make people healthy and which ones do us harm. The immune system works hard to keep the body healthy, but viruses use a variety of "sneaky tricks" to escape the body's natural defenses against disease. Jacquelyn Braggin studies the tools most important to viruses in their battle with the immune system. According to Braggin, understanding how and why viruses use these tools can help determine how viruses make us sick and how to prevent them from doing so. Braggin is a graduate student in the Microbiology Department. Presented by: Town Hall and UW's Engage: The Science Speaker Series, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures, with the University of Washington. Series sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to Nicholas P. Money: The Microbes Around Us at 7:30 p.m. Town Hall Member Benefits: Priority seating. Doors open: 5:30 p.m. Learn more: About Engage. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/uw-science-now-sharon-greenblum-stories-from-your-stomach-jacquelyn-braggin-viruses-sneak-to-survive/
Tuesday
May
20
2014
Tuesday, May 20, 2014 from 7:30-8:45pm
7:30-8:45pm
NASA telescopes recently discovered potential dark matter at the center of the Milky Way, but scientists have been on a search for this substance for years. With known particles making up a mere five percent of the universe, the hunt for the remaining percentage (dark matter) could have a huge impact on our understanding of the cosmos. Theoretical physicist Katherine Freese offers a historical account of this quest, from its initial discovery to current understanding, and gives a glimpse of its immense (and largely unknown) possibilities. The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter is the true tale of "the most mysterious particle in the universe." Freese is Professor of Physics at the University of Michigan. Presented by: Town Hall and Elliott Bay Book Company, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to Sam Kean: Picking the Brain at 6 p.m. Doors open: 6:30 p.m. Town Hall member benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales. Learn more: About dark matter. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/katherine-freese-the-search-for-dark-matter/
Tuesday, May 20, 2014 from 6-7:15pm
6-7:15pm
Early attempts to understand the human brain stemmed from the misfortunes of others -- accidents, seizures, and infectious diseases were the key to unlocking the mind's secrets. These injuries had numerous effects including altered personalities, loss of memory, and complete psychological transformations -- without which, modern-day neuroscience wouldn't be possible. Sam Kean's latest book, The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human Brain as Revealed by True Stories of Trauma, Madness, and Recovery, explores the complex history of scientists prodding the brain, and the personal (sometimes gory) stories of the people affected. A contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and New Scientist, Kean is also the author of The Disappearing Spoon and The Violinist's Thumb. Presented by: Town Hall and Elliott Bay Book Company, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to Katherine Freese: The Search for Dark Matter at 7:30 p.m. Town Hall Member Benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales. Doors open: 5:00 p.m. Learn more: About Kean. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/sam-kean-picking-the-brain/
Monday
May
19
2014
Monday, May 19, 2014 from 7:30-8:45pm
7:30-8:45pm
The dangerous effects of global warming on health, ecosystems, natural disasters, and economics are at an all-time high, according to a recent United Nations report. Despite a better understanding of the science behind climate change, author Joshua Howe says we still don't have a handle on this environmental problem. In Behind the Curve: Science and the Politics of Global Warming, he traces the history of the global warming debate, beginning with Charles D. Keeling's 1958 readings of CO2. Howe says a solution is hard to find because political opponents focus on the science behind these discoveries, rather than what they say about our changing planet. In a history fraught with developing world vs. the developed world and liberals vs. conservatives, understanding the past is an important step in moving forward. Howe is a professor of history and environmental studies at Reed College. Presented by: Town Hall and Elliott Bay Book Company, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to UW Science Now: Chelsea Kahn: Communicating Climate Change at 6:00 p.m. Doors open: 7:00 p.m. Town Hall member benefits: Priority seating, discounted onsite book sales. Learn more: Read a review. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/joshua-howe-the-global-warming-rut/
Monday, May 19, 2014 from 6-7pm
6-7pm
Conveying environmental issues to the general public has challenges, but according to Chelsea Kahn, this is especially difficult when the facts are disseminated through the media. Her research examines the communication of uncertain information before and after scientific reports have been published. She'll share her analysis of English newspapers from four South Asian countries and their coverage of climate change. Kahn is a Master's candidate at the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs. Presented by: Town Hall and UW's Engage: The Science Speaker Series, as part of The Seattle Science Lectures, with the University of Washington. Series sponsored by Microsoft. Series media sponsorship provided by KPLU. Tickets: $5. Double Feature! Admission to this event also gains access to Joshua Howe: The Global Warming Rut at 7:30 p.m. Town Hall Member Benefits: Priority seating. Doors open: 5:30 p.m. Learn more: About Engage. READ MORE: http://www.townhallseattle.org/uw-science-now-chelsea-kahn-communicating-climate-change/